Time Traveling to Ireland’s Temple House

No photograph could prepare me for the my first glimpse of Temple House, a Georgian mansion set on an estate of 1,000 acres a few miles south of Sligo. After I drove past the gates and through the green pastures filled with sheep, the sight of the stately home took my breath away. It’s huge and imposing—like something out of a wonderful costume-drama film.

TempleHouse

I stepped back into history during my visit to Temple House, an Irish country manor in the rural area south of Sligo, named for ruined medieval Knights Templar Castle on the grounds. Photo ©Laurel Kallenbach

Despite the grandeur—and everything from Temple House’s exterior to its antique-furnished rooms is grand—it’s a homey place run by the down-to-earth Perceval family, who have lived here since 1665. Deb and Sandy used to manage the guesthouse until their retirement; they’ve since turned it over to their son, Roderick, and daughter-in-law, Helena.

In My Lady’s Chamber

I stayed in the smallest room: the pink room, which is anything but small. I slept cozily in a half-canopied bed and tucked my luggage into a huge wardrobe, as if I were Irish gentry. I had a small writing desk, and I absolutely adored throwing open my ceiling-high shuttered windows each morning to behold the soft, green fields dotted with sheep. (The only thing not historic—and happily so—is the bathrooms. They’re modern.)

 

Bedroom in Temple House, Sligo, Ireland

There are six guest rooms much like this one, all lavishly furnished with a mixture of family heirlooms and other antiques. ©Laurel Kallenbach

Although the mansion has 100 rooms, only a handful of them are restored and habitable. (Imagine trying to heat 100 rooms! In fact, I doubt there’s electrical wiring to all parts of the house.)

I especially loved the elegant dining room, the site of fabulous breakfasts and dinners. (The innkeepers emphasize locally grown foods, many from their own organic garden.) Guests gather at the immense, lavishly-set table while a crackling fire warms the room and paintings of the Perceval ancestors peer down from the walls. Roderick regaled us with colorful tales of his family through the centuries. I’d look from his face to his Victorian forebears—and noticed the same features: a similar nose, the shape of the eyes, a chin!

I can’t imagine growing up amidst so much history and finery, but then I remember that it takes huge sums just to keep up the place. The Percevals have to work hard preparing meals, cleaning bathrooms, changing linens and entertaining guests, so it’s a modest living—just in a grand setting.

Tea is served every afternoon in this cozy parlor. (The homemade chocolate biscuits, shortbread and fudge are divine!) ©Laurel Kallenbach

Tea is served every afternoon in this cozy parlor. (The homemade chocolate biscuits, shortbread and fudge are divine!) ©Laurel Kallenbach

The best part of Temple House? Countless things: It’s so comfortable, wondrously welcoming, and the fellow travelers I met were excellent company. There’s a lake that you can boat or fish on and ruins of a 13th-century Knights Templar Castle on the property to explore. (The Templar Castle gives the Temple House estate its name.)

Yet, what I loved most was feeling like I had stepped back into history. (If you really like old stuff, and want to travel back to pre-history, make a day trip to the nearby ancient Carrowmore Megalithic complex.) But even if there were nothing else in the vicinity to do, I can think of no more charming place to relax, read a book, eat fabulous food and dream of eras past than at Temple House.

Laurel Kallenbach, writer and editor

Read more about my travels in Ireland:

P.S. For more tips on places to visit in Ireland, visit Discover Ireland.

Photo of the Week: A Colorful Breakfast in Jamaica

Tastes of the tropics: watermelon and star apple fruit, with grapefruit on the far platter ©Laurel Kallenbach

On a Jamaica visit, I spent a week at a yoga and creative writing retreat at Bromley, a historic estate perched high in the hills in the St. Ann area. Every morning a platter of fresh tropical fruit appeared on the table. On this day, we dove into grapefruit, watermelon and star apple fruit—along with Jamaican coffee, of course.

Read more about my travels in Jamaica:

Laurel Kallenbach, freelance writer and editor

 

Cold Weather & Warm Memories at Canada’s Lake Louise

We sat at the center window of the Lakeview Lounge at Chateau Lake Louise. Photo courtesy Fairmont Chateau Lake Louise

It’s a triple-treat kind of day in the Canadian Rockies. Feeling like royalty, my husband and I dine on an early lunch at the Fairmont Chateau Lake Louise’s Lakeview Lounge, where we’re seated at the picture-window table overlooking one of the most beautiful views on the planet. On the other side of the glass, steep mountains plunge into iced-over Lake Louise. The pines are flocked in white; a light snowfall whispers down over the scene.

Iconic landscape, iconic hotel, iconic window-seat on nature’s spectacle.

Though it’s barely 15 degrees outside, we’re lapping up epic beauty while slurping spoonfuls of steaming roasted butternut squash soup and biting into a savory pulled-pork barbecue sandwich (me) and veggie quiche (Ken).

It’s difficult to know what to focus on: tasty lunch or the view—especially for Ken, who has just returned from a brisk nordic ski through the surrounding woods. Back and forth we go, one minute exclaiming over the cuisine, the next marveling over the wintry wonderland outside. All the while, we can hardly believe we’re staying at the Chateau, a luxury Fairmont property located in Banff National Park.

The Fairmont Chateau perches on Lake Louise, a UNESCO World Heritage Site located within Banff National Park. Photo courtesy Fairmont Chateau Lake Louise

We ask the waitress to take our picture; she snaps one, and then the camera battery goes dead. Ken and I have only scant photographic evidence of our good fortune, but the majority of our memories from this lunch-to-remember will be preserved on our human memory cards forever.

He Skis; She Doesn’t

Our trip to the Canadian Rocky Mountains in winter is a consolation trip in replacement for a June birthday vacation that was canceled because of my urgent hip surgery. What we needed was a wintertime getaway that allowed Ken to ski while I enjoyed the scenery from a non-slippery vantage point. We couldn’t have chosen a better locale than Lake Louise: for sunrise-to-sunset views of this UNESCO World Heritage Site, there’s no better place to stay than the historic Fairmont Chateau Lake Louise.

(We chose to stay in a less-pricey forest-view room. Although our bedroom window didn’t overlook the lake, we watched the sun set on the snow-covered peaks and the full moon rise behind them without leaving the comfort of our well-appointed accommodations. The room was small, but well laid out so that we weren’t tripping over each other. And having a tea kettle and coffeemaker was convenient too.)

In the hotel’s posh indoors, we rubbed elbows with well-heeled folks on ski holiday, attendees of a spectrometry conference, and Olympic skiers (our trip coincided with the 2014 Women’s World Cup). The Fairmont Chateau was the perfect place to sigh over nature’s grandeur without donning thermal underwear and a parka.

The Walliser Stube restaurant at the Chateau also has a divine view of Lake Louise. Photo courtesy Fairmont Chateau Lake Louise

I did venture outside with Ken on the Lake Louise trail, which had been plowed and packed down for easier walking. Thanks to ice-traction devices called Stabl-Icers (strap-on cleats for boots) and a couple of hiking poles, I strolled around part of the lake without fear of falling.

A shot of us during a winter walk around Lake Louise.

The rest of our two-night stay, I swam in the indoor pool and soaked in the warm whirlpool—and was overjoyed to spend a couple of idle hours (how often does that happen?) sipping hot tea in the Lakeview Lounge. I gazed out at icy Victoria Glacier spilling into the frozen lake and hummed along to classy 1940s and ’50s-era tunes piped through the sound system—and felt deeply content.

When Margaret Whiting crooned “If it’s a crime, then I’m guilty… guilty of dreaming of you,” I knew that was the theme song of our stay here. I’ll never hear that song without thinking of our dreamy vacation in the snow at Lake Louise.

Green, Even in Winter

Fairmont Hotels & Resorts embraces environmentally sustainable business and operations practices and takes proactive steps to reduce carbon output and help mitigate the effects of global warming by:

  • conserving water by installating low-flow showerheads, low-flush toilets, and tap aerators. All properties participate in sheet and towel exchange programs to reduce frequency of laundering guest linens.
  • using alternative energy. Fifty percent of the Fairmont Chateau Lake Louise’s electricity is provided by a blend of wind and run-of-river electricity generation.
  • minimizing waste produced and diverting waste from landfills through recycling
  • sourcing local organic produce and focusing on farm-to-table cuisine in its restaurants
  • supporting sustainable seafood by purchasing only non-endangered fish species harvested in ways that limit damage to marine or aquatic habitats.
  • valuing the natural and cultural heritage of its properties
  • building local partnerships in the communities where it does business

Laurel Kallenbach, freelance writer and editor

A Welsh Castle Ghost Story

In 2007, Ken and I spent two nights at the haunted Gwydir Castle in the foothills of Snowdonia, North Wales. Even though the place is called a castle, the Tudor-era structure feels more like a manor house or mansion than the towering medieval fortress ruins that dot the region.

Gwydir Castle in north Wales is a lovely bed and breakfast—and home to several ghosts.

(If you’re a castle lover, northern Wales is your dream destination.) Gwydir is a private home, a museum, and a bed-and-breakfast (with two rooms)—all historically decorated in antiques.

Yet, this charming Tudor “castle” has a ruined past. Built around 1500, it was the ancestral home of the powerful Wynn family, descended from the Kings and Princes of Gwynedd. It was rat-infested, crumbling and damp—and being used as a night club when Judy Corbett and her husband-to-be Peter Welford bought it in 1994.

There are 10 acres of gardens at the historic Gwydir Castle. Peacocks roam the grounds. At night, their haunting cries seem to call "help, help!"

(For a vividly written account of Judy and Peter’s process of bringing Gwydir Castle back to life, read Judy’s memoir, Castles in the Air.)

The couple had little money but a passion for history, so they spent years living in a construction zone doing much of the painstaking historical restoration themselves. In the process, they encountered a number of ghosts with hundreds of years worth of sitings.

Meet the Ghosts

There’s a female spirit who is reportedly a victim of her lover, one of the Wynn baronets, who stuffed her body behind the wall in a passageway—or possibly in a secret enclosure within the wall called a Priest’s Hole. (A Priest’s Hole was a hiding place for Roman Catholic priests during the turbulent Tudor years when Britain’s “official” religion vascillated between Protestantism and Catholicism, depending on the monarch.)

This behind-the-wall Priest's Hole was possibly the hiding place of a murdered mistress in the 1600s.

Many people report a foul smell in one of the house passageways—the centuries-old stench of the woman’s corpse. Ken and I smelled nothing, but the passageway certainly feels colder than the rest of the house.

There’s also a ghost of Sir John Wynn—possibly the murderer—who is often seen on the spiral staircase. Gwydir even has a ghost dog, a large one. Judy and Peter actually dug up the skeleton of a large dog years ago in the basement.

Ken and I didn’t do any actual “ghost hunting” at night. Instead, we slept cozily in our four-poster canopy bed in the Duke of Beaufort’s Chamber, a lovely large room furnished with antiques and a private bath in the hall.

Our castle room: The Duke of Beaufort's Chamber

Except for the bedrooms, the castle does not use electricity (to keep it authentic). And, at night, the alarm system is activated, so one doesn’t want to creep about and wake the whole house. Besides, why would ghosts appear only at night?

The closest I came to an apparition was when the castle’s two large lurchers (a British breed of dog I’d never heard of before) bounded through the breakfast room. A moment later, a third dog nosed through the breakfast room door and streaked across the room. But, there were only two dogs that I knew of! Could the third have been the ghost dog wanting to join the living pair in play?

Malevolent Lady Margaret

The wisteria-surrounded doorway into the B&B section of Gwydir Castle

There is (or at least was) one sinister spirit at Gwydir Castle, a woman who haunted Judy for months early during the renovation. Lady Margaret followed Judy everywhere and triggered a series of “accidents” apparently intended to harm Peter.

Fortunately, Lady Margaret Cave—whose good nature darkened radically after the birth of her son in the early 1600s—has not appeared since. She was married to the philanderer Sir John Wynn, so perhaps being married to him sent her into an eternal rage against the man of the house.

Dream Come True: Sleeping in a Castle

There’s nothing nightmarish about staying at Gwydir. In fact, spending two days among its archways, mullioned and wisteria-covered windows, and Tudor-style beams was a dream come true. It’s a little like sleeping in a museum—a fantasy of mine since I was 10 and read From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler.

The dining room is lavishly restored with its original wood panels, which were spirited off to America by William Randolph Hearst in the 1920s.

The castle dining room has a story so long and fascinating I can’t even go into it here. Suffice it to say that its glorious Tudor panels were bought by William Randolph Hearst in the 1920s and stored at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York for decades. Now they’re magnificently back in the castle.

Gwydir Castle is three miles from the resort town of Betws-y-Coed and 12 miles from the medieval walled town of Conwy, so it’s a great B&B to stay at while exploring the North Wales castles. It’s also within walking distance of the market town of Llanrwst, which has train and bus connections plus several good restaurants and pubs.

Gwydir Castle is open to the public (admission fee) March through October. Check for times.

P.S. I highly recommend Judy Corbett’s book, Castles in the Air: The Restoration Adventures of Two Young Optimists and a Crumbling Old Mansion (Random House, UK, 2004). I bought a copy while staying at the castle, and I read it on train rides across Wales and on the plane home.

Laurel Kallenbach, freelance writer and editor

Spooky Postscript

In gathering photos for this blog entry, I noticed that a number of them have round, ghostly patches of light. At first I thought they were shiny flash spots or reflections, yet most of them are against backgrounds with no reflective surfaces. Then I thought they might be dust motes or raindrops on the camera lens.

But they appear in indoor photos and those taken on sunny days. Could they be blobs of ectoplasm? Were Gwydir’s spirits dancing around us?

You decide. Let me know what you think by leaving a comment below.

Here I am in the lovely breakfast room. Note the halo around the unlit candlestick behind me. For comparison, the candle on the table is lit—and has a simple glow. Methinks there's a spirit lurking.

Gwydir Gate, with some white, round lights. Are they ghost entities or merely raindrops on the camera lens?