A Flock of Witches Paddles California’s Morro Bay for Charity

Each year, a shadowy group of witches and warlocks creates a fun and frightful scene when they take over Morro Bay, California, the weekend before Halloween . Local professional photographer Danna Joy Dykstra-Coy witnessed the event and memorialized the 2019 scene with these amazing photographs.

The annual Witch’s Paddle at Morro Bay, California. Photo © Danna Joy Dykstra-Coy

“We started the Witch’s Paddle event in 2013 to celebrate Halloween,” says Annette Ausseresses, one of the original witch paddlers. “Since then, we’ve seen the idea really take off, and now there are Witch’s and Warlock’s Paddles happening from coast to coast.”

The Halloween fun is even better now that it has an altruistic aspect. “We decided to add a donation component to this year’s event and get the public involved,” says Ausseresses. Canned goods and/or cash donations were collected at the Witch’s Paddle by the Food Bank of San Luis Obispo County, a network of community partners dedicated to alleviating hunger in San Luis Obispo County and building a healthier community.

Solo witch in the harbor of Morro Bay. Photo ©Danna Joy Dykstra-Coy

The public is invited to join in the paddle or to watch the floating coven in the harbor. (Please note that there’s no instruction, lifeguards, or supervision at the event. Participants are encouraged to follow Coast Guard requirements for personal flotation devices, and each person is responsible for providing their own equipment and costume.) For board rentals, contact Morro Bay Stand Up Paddleboarding, which can make sure all scary participants are fitted with the most suitable board.

Explore Morro Bay by Foot, Car, or Broomstick

Located along coastal Highway 1 in San Luis Obispo County just south of Big Sur—and midway between Los Angeles and San Francisco—Morro Bay offers activities that range from ocean-side golf, kayaking, sailing, hiking, fishing, surfing, biking, and bird watching, to kite flying, shopping, dining, wine bars, local craft brews and miles of unspoiled beaches.

This active, seaside fishing village has a bustling waterfront and offers a fun and funky getaway for travelers who seek great wine, seafood, and outdoor adventures.

Morro Bay is famous for massive Morro Rock, named “El Morro” (Spanish for “crown-shaped hill”) by Portuguese explorer Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo in 1542.

Witches paddle near Morro Rock to raise money for the local food bank. Photo ©Danna Joy Dykstra-Coy

Morro Rock is so prominent that it’s been dubbed the “Gibraltar of the Pacific.” It’s a State Historic Landmark, bird sanctuary, and home to nesting peregrine falcons.

The rock itself is the last of a line of long-extinct volcanoes, which include nine peaks, called the Nine Sisters, ranging from San Luis Obispo to Morro Bay.

Morro Bay’s charm and mild Mediterranean climate offer an idyllic coastal escape great for kayaking, surfing stand-up paddling, hiking, camping, and more, so bring your broom and join the fun.

For more information on things to do and see in Morro Bay, visit www.morrobay.org.

Laurel Kallenbach, freelance writer, editor, and writing coach

Floating flock of witches on Morro Bay. Photo © Danna Joy Dykstra-Coy

 

Ireland’s Púca Festival: Where the Halloween Story Begins

It might surprise you to learn that Halloween originated as a Celtic celebration for the new year, which in the Celtic calendar began on November 1st. (The Celts lived about 2,000 years ago in the area that’s now Ireland, the United Kingdom, and northern France.)

The Púca Festival is named for a shape-shifting spirit from Celtic folklore. Photo courtesy Tourism Ireland

This tradition of “Hallowe’en” (short for “hallowed evening”) originated as the ancient Celtic festival of Samhain (pronounced “Sow-win”)—which means “summer’s end” in Gaelic (Old Irish). It was celebrated with bonfires and costumes to ward off bad spirits. Samhain was a festival marking the end of the Celtic year and the start of a new one. It was believed to be a time of transition, when the spirits of all those who had passed away since the previous Oíche Shamhna (Night of Samhain) moved onto the next life.

Samhain was the last great gathering before winter, a time of feasting and remembering what had passed and preparing for what was to come in the future.

Over time, Halloween became Christianized and was known as All Hallows Eve—the night before All Saints Day. Some of the original pagan Samhain traditions were incorporated into the day we now call Halloween.

Modern Ireland’s First Púca Festival

This year, an inaugural Púca Festival celebrates Ireland as Halloween’s place of origin. The festivities are vibrant and contemporary, even though they are strongly rooted in the traditions of the country where Halloween’s traditions all began.

Púca takes place from October 31 through November 2, 2019, in three historic towns located within two Irish counties, and the festivities promise to be an unforgettable celebration of all things unearthly.

Photo courtesy Tourism Ireland

Named after Púca (pronounced “pooka”), a shape-shifting spirit or goblin from Celtic folklore, the Púca Festival will capture the spirit of Samhain with three nights of authentic Halloween music, food, light, and spectacle. According to folklore, Púca is oftenseen in the form of a dog, rabbit, goat, goblin, or old man. Traditionally, a Púca appears as a dark horse with a wild, flowing mane.

The Púca Festival will salute the Halloween spirit with processions, light installations, Irish music, and harvest-inspired food. The festival kicks off in the town of Athboy, in County Meath, with The Coming of Samhain (October 31), a re-creation of the symbolic lighting of the Samhain fires in the shadow of The Hill of Ward, one of the earliest places where Samhain was celebrated.

Elsewhere in County Meath, the spectacular Trim Castle becomes the stage for three supernatural nights of music, light, and Halloween fun. The castle grounds come to life each night with aerialists, Púca performers, castle projections, and laser shows—along with the Púca Food & Craft Market.

The Celtic Halloween spirit is alive at Ireland’s inaugural Púca Festival. Photo courtesy Tourism Ireland

The castle will also play host to a world-class selection of musicians, including Jerry Fish’s Púca Sideshow, Just Mustard, Pillow Queens, AE MAK, and Kormac and the Irish Chamber Orchestra.

Bringing the town of Drogheda (County Louth) to life, the third festival hub will be a haunting, three-day program of music, film, and light installations. The town will play host to projection artists de:LUX, whose artworks over the three festival nights will draw inspiration from tales of Irish folklore and the spirits of Halloween.

Púca Festival will be the ultimate celebration of this time when light turns to dark, the veil between realities draws thin, rules can be broken, and the spirits move between worlds.

For more info, visit Tourism Ireland and Púca Festival.

Laurel Kallenbach, freelance writer, editor, and writing coach

Photo courtesy Tourism Ireland

Ghosts That Haunt Bath, England

Are you brave enough to seek out Bath’s most haunted locations this Halloween? There are plenty of places in and around the historic city of Bath with fascinating ghostly histories and scary stories.

Feel the chills at the haunted halls of Longleat House. Photo courtesy of Longleat

In such a beautiful town, it’s not surprising that some restless spirits still walk the beautiful streets of Bath and refuse to leave some of the elegant buildings they once frequented in life.

For a truly frightening evening, take a ghost walk of the city. A guide will lead you and share the startling stories about Bath’s haunted history with Ghost Walks of Bath. Or, explore the following ghoulish locations on your own…if you dare, that is!

The Grey Lady Ghost: Theatre Royal & Garrick’s Head Pub

The top, left-hand box facing the stage at the Theatre Royal in Bath is said to be the favorite haunt of the Grey Lady ghost. Legend has it that she fell madly in love with an actor in the 18th century and hung herself when her love was unrequited.

The Theatre Royal’s dramatic productions can’t surpass that of the legend of the Grey Lady ghost. Photo courtesy Visit Bath

Built in 1805, the Georgian-era Theatre Royal was beautifully refurbished in 2010. The Main House offers a year-round theatrical program, including many West End productions of plays, operas, comedies, dance, along with frequent Sunday concerts.

You may make it out of the theatre without encountering any specters, but you aren’t safe from the ghost of the Grey Lady even after you leave the Theatre! She is also said to haunt the Garrick’s Head Pub just next door.

Sit back and watch the hustle and bustle of Bath go by while enjoying a beer at Garrick’s Head Pub in downtown Bath. Photo courtesy Garrick’s Head

The Garrick’s Head is renowned as the most haunted pub in Bath, and the ghost of the Grey Lady is only one of the weird encounters you might have. The story they tell at Garrick’s is that the Grey Lady threw herself from an upstairs window following the death of her lover in a dual with her husband. (Slightly different story but with the same gruesome result!) Her hauntings of the theatre and pub are said to leave behind a lingering scent of jasmine.

More alarmingly, over the years Garrick’s Head landlords and bar staff have reported incidents of a poltergeist throwing candles and cash registers across the bar. In addition, it’s said that a blood stain appears on the pub floor in the same place every year.

Garrick’s Head was once the home of the famous Beau Nash, a celebrated “dandy” and the leader of fashion in 18th-century Britain. Nash was the Master of Ceremonies in Bath, a renowned spa town visited by the rich and royal.

Unsurprisingly, Garrick’s Head is a stately building, and its location next to the Theatre Royal always makes for an interesting and colorful crowd. It is open every day from noon onward; lunch and dinner are served in the bar, on the terrace, or in the dining room.

Lady Louisa of Longleat House

Though it is best known for its safari park, Longleat Estate also has some dark attractions even more wild than gorillas and hyenas.

Keep a lookout for the ghost of Lady Louisa who still wanders the ancient halls frantically searching for her long-lost footman lover. The story goes that her jealous husband confronted the footman and pushed him down the stairs before burying him in the cellar, unbeknownst to Lady Louisa.

Nestled in 900 acres of Capability Brown–landscaped grounds, Longleat Manor—20 miles south of Bath—is one of the finest Elizabethan stately homes in the country. There you can step back through over 450 years of history and marvel at the fantastic collection of artworks, paintings, tapestries, and furniture collected over generations.

The wandering phantom of Longleat House. Photo courtesy Longleat

Jungle Kingdom and Animal Adventure let visitors get close to amazing animals. On the six-and-a-half-mile drive-through experience, there’s plenty to look for, from cheeky monkeys to majestic lions.

Make this year’s Halloween one you won’t forget in a hurry with a spine-tingling Longleat Ghost Tour. Your guide will take you through the spooky cellars, attics, and corridors as you explore the Wiltshire estate’s chilling past, from October 26 to November 3, 2019. Suitable for children aged nine and over, this tour will feature live actors, so it’s not for the faint-hearted!

A Hanged Housekeeper: Francis Hotel

The historic Francis Hotel in Bath is haunted by a former housekeeper who sadly hanged herself after a long period of depression. Guests have reported being kept awake by the sounds of her scratching and tapping from inside their room. One guest reported their hot water bottle fles off the table in their bedroom.

The specter of a depressed maid stalks the posh halls of Bath’s Francis Hotel
Photo courtesy Francis Hotel Bath-MGallery

Love Never Dies: Amarone Restaurant

Beau Nash’s lover, Juliana Popjoy, was so distraught when the renowned 17th-century socialite died that she lived the rest of her life in a hollowed-out tree (!!), vowing never to sleep in a bed again. Her ghost now apparently haunts their former home, which is now the chic Italian restaurant, Amarone, located in one of Bath’s elegant Georgian buildings.

Amarone’s relaxed atmosphere, combined with thoughtfully created menus and impressive decor, ensures a memorable experience in Beau Nash’s former home. The menu includes freshly prepared pasta dishes, locally sourced steaks and fish fresh from the Dorset coast, as well as stone-baked pizzas and delectable desserts. The wine list has been compiled to complement the traditional yet innovative Italian cuisine.

As you enjoy your meal at Amarone, you might notice a woman in 1960s-style clothes dining alone. She seems perfectly normal—until she disappears, presumably about the time she receives the bill!

Two ghosts grace the Italian restaurant Amazon. Photo courtesy Amarone Restaurant

Carriage of Eloping Lovers: The Royal Crescent

Will you see the phantom horse-drawn carriage outside The Royal Crescent, Bath’s most iconic landmark? The carriage is often spotted and is thought to carry Elizabeth Linley and playwright Richard Brinsley Sheridan as they eloped in 1772. Sheridan won Miss Linley’s hand after he dueled with Captain Thomas Matthews. The marriage started out happy, but later Sheridan was unfaithful. Shortly thereafter, poor Elizabeth contracted tuberculosis and died at age 38.

The 500-foot-long Royal Crescent is arranged around a perfect lawn overlooking Royal Victoria Park and forms a sweeping crescent of terrace houses. It is one of the greatest examples of Georgian architecture anywhere in the United Kingdom.

Bath’s Royal Crescent: the scene of a ghostly elopement. Photo courtesy Visit Bath.

Today, The Royal Crescent is home to a museum of Georgian life at No. 1 Royal Crescent, the five-star Royal Crescent Hotel & Spa, and private housing. You might have seen this popular location in various films and period dramas. Jane Austen’s Persuasion included many scenes shot at the Royal Crescent, and it’s also featured in the 2008 film The Duchess starring Keira Knightley.

For more information, check the Visit Bath website. 

Laurel Kallenbach, freelance writer and editor

Photo courtesy Visit Bath