Facing West: My Favorite Maui Sunsets

Ho’okipa Beach Park is just one location on Maui for stunning sunsets. ©Laurel Kallenbach

May 2018 update: The eruption of the Kilauea Volcano on Hawaii is as dramatic as the Maui sunsets pictured here, but as of this posting, the volcano is not a danger to visitors or residents on most parts of the Big Island. For travel alerts on all Hawaiian islands, check the Hawaiian Tourism Authority’s special alerts page

As the sun starts to dip toward the horizon on the island of Maui, you can sense the excitement in the air.

Tourists as well as locals plan their day around where they’ll be during the sunset with almost cultish passion. My husband and I worked most of our evening meals around sunset—it’s that exciting and awe-inspiring.

Although there are probably hundreds of spots for sunset watching on the Hawaiian Islands, here are three different locales on Maui where we enjoyed breathtaking color and dramatic cloud formations as daytime morphed into nighttime.

This is definitely island life at its best, and one of the prime reasons to travel to beaches and islands.

The Fiery Blaze

We spent four nights on west-facing Keawakapu Beach at the Hale Hui Kai beach condos, and every evening, a fire dancer arrived and twirled his lit batons as onlookers ooh-ed and ahh-ed. Upstaging him were the brilliant bands of clouds on fire as they were reflected in the water.

A fire dancer added even more local color to sunset at Keawakapu Beach, Maui ©Laurel Kallenbach

Maui’s Keawakapu Beach offers breathtaking sunsets 365 days a year.

You can’t beat Keawakapu Beach, in south Kihei, Maui for sunsets. ©Laurel Kallenbach

The Serene Sunset

On calm Napili Bay, stand-up paddlers tended to float along as the sky lit with stunning pinks and oranges. Most of the nights we stayed at the Napili Kai Resort, we marveled at the splendid sunsets from our private balcony.

A standup paddler takes advantage of the calm waters of Maui’s Napili Bay. ©Laurel Kallenbach

The Big Wow

Our friend Sandy drove us to Ho’okipa Beach Park (near the cute town of Paia) just as the sun began to slip into the west. It was our last sunset: two hours later we were boarding the plane to fly home. With a cliff, dramatic lava rocks, and huge waves filled with expert surfers, Ho’okipa Beach Park was the perfect place to cap off our trip to Hawaii.

Sun rays explode through the clouds of Iao Valley. We watched this sunset from Ho’okipa Beach Park. ©Laurel Kallenbach

Here, bright rays streamed through Iao Valley with biblical illumination. Then we walked down the hill to be closer to the water’s crash on the lava rocks, where we watched the sky turn pink, salmon, cantaloupe, and turquoise. The wind whipped; we could feel ocean spray on our faces. And always the light changed and grew more intense. The Ho’okipa sunset was quite a dramatic sendoff, and it sealed our resolved to visit Maui again soon.

Laurel Kallenbach, freelance writer and editor

Originally published May 2014

 

Heaven in Hawaii: Napili Kai Beach Resort, Maui

A double rainbow arcs over Napili Bay on the west coast of Maui. We witnessed this beauty from our ocean-view lanai. ©Laurel Kallenbach

Let me start by saying this: I cried when my husband and I checked out of Napili Kai Beach Resort on Maui’s west coast.

I’ve stayed in many wonderful hotels on gorgeous beaches, but this low-key, low-rise, plantation-style resort on secluded-by-Maui-standards Napili Bay was so perfect for us that when I turned in our room keys, I felt like flinging myself over the reception desk and begging the staff to let me stay.

Napili Kai had everything we as a couple love: a quiet, sandy beach with good snorkeling; luxurious but unpretentious accommodations; cultural and environmental appreciation; a good restaurant with fresh, local ingredients; friendly people (both staff and other guests); and all-included resort amenities like beach chairs, towels, parking, and many activities (the hotel’s motto is “we don’t nickel-and-dime you.”

The Napili Kai building blend unobtrusively into the island landscape. Buildings higher than three stories are banned from Napili Bay, so development has never become an eyesore. ©Laurel Kallenbach

Blissing Out on Ocean Time

Ken and I stayed in casual luxury in a beachfront studio unit: king-sized bed; fully equipped kitchen; huge, two-chambered bathroom with walk-in shower; and a lanai—oh, the lanai with its unparalleled ocean view facing west for excellent sunsets. Two of the three nights we spent at Napili Kai, we got Thai takeout and enjoyed Panang curry and cold Aloha Beer (brewed in Honolulu) in the loungers on our lanai while watching the sun sink below the horizon.

At night, we turned off the air conditioning, opened the lanai doors, and slept to the sound of waves lapping against the black lava rock outside.

At sunset, a man lights the torches along the beach at Napili Kai. ©Laurel Kallenbach

Because our internal clocks were three hours ahead of Pacific Time, it was easy to take advantage of early morning at the beach. Each day, Ken and I watched green turtles surfing near the shallow rocks close to shore. Their heads bobbed on the surface; fins flapped above the whitecaps. Occasionally one rolled in the surf. I assume it was for fun and not hunting, because green turtles are herbivores. As they munched on algae and seagrass, they seemed to savor the act of cavorting in the waves.

We got to view the turtles from an underwater vantage when we snorkeled along the two reefs in the fairly calm waters of Napili Bay. The first thing we saw was a trio of Moorish idols, the most impressive and elegant of tropical fish. We also spotted puffer fish, a dragon eel, butterflyfish of several varieties, red sea urchins, and purple or yellow coral. But the most unique experience was snorkeling with a pair of turtles. They glide through the water so gracefully that they seem more like angels than reptiles.

Riding the Wave of Hawaiian Culture

Local children learn Polynesian dances and perform weekly at the Napili Kai. ©Laurel Kallenbach

What sets Napili Kai apart from many other beach resorts is that it highlights traditional Hawaiian culture. Most mornings, the hotel serves coffee, tea, and fresh pineapple in the Beach Cabana and presents cultural demonstrations such as lei making, wood carving, tapa cloth making, and palm weaving.

Napili Kai also helps perpetuate Hawaiian culture through its support of the nonprofit Napili Kai Foundation, which shares Hawaii’s cultural legacy with Maui’s children. Every Tuesday, Napili Kai guests can attend a free, onsite hula show in which young kids and teens perform authentic songs and dances of Polynesia with live adult musicians. Though the performances aren’t as polished as a professional hula show (I must say that the teen performers are extremely good), the costumes are colorful and the representation of Tahitian, Samoan, Maori, and Hawaiian cultures is satisfying.

George Kahumoku plays 12-string slack-key guitar and sings weekly. ©Laurel Kallenbach

There’s more: Napili Kai presents the Masters of Hawaiian Slack-Key Guitar concert series every Wednesday. Hosted by Grammy winner George Kahumoku, Jr. (who was featured on the soundtrack of the movie, The Descendants), this was an opportunity for Ken and me to hear live, island vocal and guitar music. (“Slack-key” is a style that originated in Hawaii, in which the player loosens the tuning of the guitar strings.)

We loved the sound. Hawaiian guitar music has a gentleness and warmth that can only come from hearing the waves and feeling tropical sea breezes on your shoulders. Now, when the temperatures are below zero, just hearing Hawaiian music takes me back to Napili Kai, my ideal place for relaxing Maui style.

Laurel Kallenbach, freelance writer and editor

Originally published Feb. 1, 2014

A crescent-shaped slice of Maui heaven: the laid-back beach and cabana of the Napili Kai. The water and snorkeling were wonderful right from the beach. ©Laurel Kallenbach