Ghosts That Haunt Bath, England

Are you brave enough to seek out Bath’s most haunted locations this Halloween? There are plenty of places in and around the historic city of Bath with fascinating ghostly histories and scary stories.

Feel the chills at the haunted halls of Longleat House. Photo courtesy of Longleat

In such a beautiful town, it’s not surprising that some restless spirits still walk the beautiful streets of Bath and refuse to leave some of the elegant buildings they once frequented in life.

For a truly frightening evening, take a ghost walk of the city. A guide will lead you and share the startling stories about Bath’s haunted history with Ghost Walks of Bath. Or, explore the following ghoulish locations on your own…if you dare, that is!

The Grey Lady Ghost: Theatre Royal & Garrick’s Head Pub

The top, left-hand box facing the stage at the Theatre Royal in Bath is said to be the favorite haunt of the Grey Lady ghost. Legend has it that she fell madly in love with an actor in the 18th century and hung herself when her love was unrequited.

The Theatre Royal’s dramatic productions can’t surpass that of the legend of the Grey Lady ghost. Photo courtesy Visit Bath

Built in 1805, the Georgian-era Theatre Royal was beautifully refurbished in 2010. The Main House offers a year-round theatrical program, including many West End productions of plays, operas, comedies, dance, along with frequent Sunday concerts.

You may make it out of the theatre without encountering any specters, but you aren’t safe from the ghost of the Grey Lady even after you leave the Theatre! She is also said to haunt the Garrick’s Head Pub just next door.

Sit back and watch the hustle and bustle of Bath go by while enjoying a beer at Garrick’s Head Pub in downtown Bath. Photo courtesy Garrick’s Head

The Garrick’s Head is renowned as the most haunted pub in Bath, and the ghost of the Grey Lady is only one of the weird encounters you might have. The story they tell at Garrick’s is that the Grey Lady threw herself from an upstairs window following the death of her lover in a dual with her husband. (Slightly different story but with the same gruesome result!) Her hauntings of the theatre and pub are said to leave behind a lingering scent of jasmine.

More alarmingly, over the years Garrick’s Head landlords and bar staff have reported incidents of a poltergeist throwing candles and cash registers across the bar. In addition, it’s said that a blood stain appears on the pub floor in the same place every year.

Garrick’s Head was once the home of the famous Beau Nash, a celebrated “dandy” and the leader of fashion in 18th-century Britain. Nash was the Master of Ceremonies in Bath, a renowned spa town visited by the rich and royal.

Unsurprisingly, Garrick’s Head is a stately building, and its location next to the Theatre Royal always makes for an interesting and colorful crowd. It is open every day from noon onward; lunch and dinner are served in the bar, on the terrace, or in the dining room.

Lady Louisa of Longleat House

Though it is best known for its safari park, Longleat Estate also has some dark attractions even more wild than gorillas and hyenas.

Keep a lookout for the ghost of Lady Louisa who still wanders the ancient halls frantically searching for her long-lost footman lover. The story goes that her jealous husband confronted the footman and pushed him down the stairs before burying him in the cellar, unbeknownst to Lady Louisa.

Nestled in 900 acres of Capability Brown–landscaped grounds, Longleat Manor—20 miles south of Bath—is one of the finest Elizabethan stately homes in the country. There you can step back through over 450 years of history and marvel at the fantastic collection of artworks, paintings, tapestries, and furniture collected over generations.

The wandering phantom of Longleat House. Photo courtesy Longleat

Jungle Kingdom and Animal Adventure let visitors get close to amazing animals. On the six-and-a-half-mile drive-through experience, there’s plenty to look for, from cheeky monkeys to majestic lions.

Make this year’s Halloween one you won’t forget in a hurry with a spine-tingling Longleat Ghost Tour. Your guide will take you through the spooky cellars, attics, and corridors as you explore the Wiltshire estate’s chilling past, from October 26 to November 3, 2019. Suitable for children aged nine and over, this tour will feature live actors, so it’s not for the faint-hearted!

A Hanged Housekeeper: Francis Hotel

The historic Francis Hotel in Bath is haunted by a former housekeeper who sadly hanged herself after a long period of depression. Guests have reported being kept awake by the sounds of her scratching and tapping from inside their room. One guest reported their hot water bottle fles off the table in their bedroom.

The specter of a depressed maid stalks the posh halls of Bath’s Francis Hotel
Photo courtesy Francis Hotel Bath-MGallery

Love Never Dies: Amarone Restaurant

Beau Nash’s lover, Juliana Popjoy, was so distraught when the renowned 17th-century socialite died that she lived the rest of her life in a hollowed-out tree (!!), vowing never to sleep in a bed again. Her ghost now apparently haunts their former home, which is now the chic Italian restaurant, Amarone, located in one of Bath’s elegant Georgian buildings.

Amarone’s relaxed atmosphere, combined with thoughtfully created menus and impressive decor, ensures a memorable experience in Beau Nash’s former home. The menu includes freshly prepared pasta dishes, locally sourced steaks and fish fresh from the Dorset coast, as well as stone-baked pizzas and delectable desserts. The wine list has been compiled to complement the traditional yet innovative Italian cuisine.

As you enjoy your meal at Amarone, you might notice a woman in 1960s-style clothes dining alone. She seems perfectly normal—until she disappears, presumably about the time she receives the bill!

Two ghosts grace the Italian restaurant Amazon. Photo courtesy Amarone Restaurant

Carriage of Eloping Lovers: The Royal Crescent

Will you see the phantom horse-drawn carriage outside The Royal Crescent, Bath’s most iconic landmark? The carriage is often spotted and is thought to carry Elizabeth Linley and playwright Richard Brinsley Sheridan as they eloped in 1772. Sheridan won Miss Linley’s hand after he dueled with Captain Thomas Matthews. The marriage started out happy, but later Sheridan was unfaithful. Shortly thereafter, poor Elizabeth contracted tuberculosis and died at age 38.

The 500-foot-long Royal Crescent is arranged around a perfect lawn overlooking Royal Victoria Park and forms a sweeping crescent of terrace houses. It is one of the greatest examples of Georgian architecture anywhere in the United Kingdom.

Bath’s Royal Crescent: the scene of a ghostly elopement. Photo courtesy Visit Bath.

Today, The Royal Crescent is home to a museum of Georgian life at No. 1 Royal Crescent, the five-star Royal Crescent Hotel & Spa, and private housing. You might have seen this popular location in various films and period dramas. Jane Austen’s Persuasion included many scenes shot at the Royal Crescent, and it’s also featured in the 2008 film The Duchess starring Keira Knightley.

For more information, check the Visit Bath website. 

Laurel Kallenbach, freelance writer and editor

Photo courtesy Visit Bath

 

Contemporary Vegetarian Dining in Historic Bath

 

The decor is as light and clean as the food. Photo: Demuth’s restaurant

I have to admit that during three weeks in Scotland and England, I ate more pork than I usually do in a year—possibly two. It’s hard to resist when the traditional English or Scottish breakfast includes locally raised bacon or sausage.

So, it was a delight to discover in downtown Bath an elegant yet down-to-earth vegetarian restaurant: Demuth’s. This contemporary-casual eatery, located just a few doors down from the iconic Sally Lunn’s, serves innovative, sophisticated vegetarian and vegan food. No meat required for flavor and character.

A beet salad with fresh, local goat cheese. Photo: Demuth’s

It was clear from the first bite, that head chef Richard Buckley assesses each vegetable and fruit for its flavor and then pairs it with unique sauces, grains, and cheeses to create a complete, tasty, and memorable dish.

And the food at Demuth’s is primarily locally sourced, fair trade, and organic. Even the wine selection offered a number of vintages made from organic grapes (though a number of them were imported from Chile and Argentina).

The wait staff was quite informed about the menu and knew the provenance of every item on it. Yet talking with our waiter was anything but stuffy; ours was kind and helpful and gracious.

Photo: Demuth’s restaurant

Whether you’re a strict vegan or just happy to take a break from meat-laden menus, Demuth’s is truly a treat.

Laurel Kallenbach, freelance writer and editor

Read more about my travels in England:

 

 

 

Bath + Brindley’s = A Brilliant British B&B

Brindley’s boutique B&B, in Bath, England, is just 10 minutes’ walk from the city center. Photo courtesy Brindley’s

Having a charming, quiet place to stay while visiting a bustling city can really make a visit special, and Ken and I were lucky enough to get to spend our nights in the town of Bath at Brindley’s,  a boutique B&B with French flair.

Although this classy Victorian family house is an easy walk from the center of Bath, Brindley’s is in a residential neighborhood with old trees and gardens, so it’s a welcome retreat from traffic and tourists.

The bedrooms—there are just six, ranging from spacious to cozy—are furnished with an eclectic mix of French-style furnishings, and the beds are luxurious with fluffy duvets. We stayed in Room 5, a smaller third-floor room that had a king bed that could be separated into two twins. Our bathroom was compact, but efficient.

Breakfast at Brindley’s

Before a full day of sightseeing, a good breakfast is essential, and the fare at Brindley’s was delightful—and a welcome change. Yes, you can order the traditional English breakfast featuring local, free-range eggs and bacon and sausage from pigs raised on what I’m sure is a pastoral Wiltshire farm not many miles away. Yet it’s a bit radical to find smoked salmon with scrambled eggs or eggs on toast as alternative breakfast entrée choices.

Bon appétit!     Photo courtesy Brindley’s

Other delicious breakfast surprises: hot croissants and pain au chocolat instead of the obligatory toast, and fresh berries or other fruit.

With some Edith Piaf songs playing in the background and a few French decorating touches, breakfast was playful and invigorating…which was just what we needed before a full day of viewing Bath’s grand, but stoic, Georgian architecture.

Happy Home away from Home

If all this weren’t enough, Brindley’s is owned by two exceedingly friendly couples, who are also très helpful with offering sightseeing and dining advice. And the B&B is also eco-conscious. In addition to the usual policy of not changing the towels and sheets each day, they’re good about recycling, serving seasonal local foods, and providing REN toiletries (free from fragrances, synthetic colors, parabens, sulfates and other harmful ingredients).

We truly appreciated having a calm place to relax—one with character, and Brindley’s has that aplenty. This lovely B&B gave us the perfect excuse to come back for a restorative nap one afternoon when our feet were tired after visits to the Circus, the Assembly Rooms, Royal Crescent, the Museum of Fashion, and Bath Abbey.

Laurel Kallenbach, freelance writer and editor

P.S. If you’ve stayed in a small B&B or hotel that made your trip special, share your find by clicking on “Reply” below.

For more information about visiting Bath, England, browse Visit Bath.

Read more about my travels in England:

We loved staying in the residential neighborhood of Pulteney Gardens in the city of Bath.     Photo courtesy Brindley’s

 

Bath Thermae Spa in England: Better Health through Water

When the traveling gets tough, the tough take a bath. After a long day of sightseeing or hiking through the countryside, one of the best things to do is soak your achy feet in the hotel hot tub or spa.

The Rooftop Pool at Thermae Bath Spa overlooks a glorious view of the city of Bath, including Bath Cathedral. © Bath Tourism Plus/Colin Hawkins

It turns out this watery antidote for stress has a long tradition: The ancient Romans had a saying for it: “sanitas per aquam,” which translates as “health through water.” And not coincidentally, the word “spa” is an acronym taken from that Latin phrase.

Geothermally warmed mineral springs were the first spas—used for healing. These waters naturally bubble up from the ground, bringing minerals from the earth’s core—minerals that can help improve certain skin conditions, arthritis and other musculoskeletal ailments.

In Bath, England, warm mineral waters have welcomed visitors for millennia. The Celts worshipped the water goddess Sulis there, and the ancient Romans (who ruled Britannia from the 1st through 5th centuries A.D.) built stone-enclosed pools and steam rooms for their health and restoration.

During the 1700s and 1800s, the British aristocracy flocked to the town of Bath for social parties and to “take the waters,” encouraged by the tale of how Queen Mary’s fertility troubles ended after she bathed in the waters and ultimately gave birth to a son.

Modern Spa, Ancient History

Today, Thermae Bath Spa is located in a chic modern building not far from the ruins of the ancient Roman baths. Although no one’s claiming anymore that the water cures infertility or any other major health problem, this is still the perfect place to shed your street clothes and spend a half- or full-day in a robe and swimsuit soaking like a Roman.

The indoor Minerva Pool has jets and moving water currents. © Thermae Bath Spa/David Saunders

My husband and I visited Thermae Bath Spa on a chilly, drizzly English afternoon, when a hot soak was most inviting. We started with a dip in the Minerva Bath, a large, indoor thermal pool equipped with massage jets, a whirlpool, and a “lazy river” with a current strong enough that it carried us around the pool. We hung onto flotation “noodles” and cruised the perimeter without moving a muscle. Between the water’s temperature (92°F) and the mineral-rich water (the slight sulfur smell is the giveaway), we felt like limp noodles.

After a long drink of water (it’s important to rehydrate while you soak), we checked out the über-cool co-ed steam rooms where we sweated in glass-enclosed circular steam areas. Each had a different aromatherapy scent: lavender, eucalyptus, rose and frankincense. A central waterfall shower was the spot where everyone gathered to cool off before trying a new scent.

At the center of the Thermae Bath Spa Steam Room is a ceiling shower for cooling off after a hot steam. © Thermae Bath Spa/David Saunders

A note about facilities: pools, steam rooms, and the locker rooms are all co-ed. This is Europe, after all! It was a little odd for us Americans who are used to gender segregation in public restrooms, gyms and pools, but we went with the flow. The locker rooms do have private cubicles where you can dress. Bathing suits (what the Brits call “swimming costumes”) are required.

Although Thermae Bath Spa offers a number of water-centric therapies—including watsu (massage done while you float in a warm pool), Vichy showers, body wraps and more—we opted for pool soaking, which we could enjoy as a couple. If you’re visiting Bath for several days, I’d highly recommend taking a separate day for a massage or special treatment.

For the grand finale, my husband and I deepened our relaxation in the steamy Rooftop Pool. The water was perfect, and the views of Bath’s skyline were spectacular. A high-pressure cascade gave us a deep-shoulder massage and sent a wave of tingles over my scalp. The added bonus: A huge rainbow appeared in the sky, arching over Bath’s cathedral. The entire pool population ooh-ed and ahh-ed at the sight. Unforgettable.

Feasting in the Natural Foods Restaurant

The spa’s Springs Café serves wonderful local cuisine. Photo courtesy Thermae Bath Spa

Afterwards, we realized we were hungry, but weren’t quite ready to leave. No problem, the spa’s Springs Café Restaurant serves everything from light snacks, appetizers, paninis, and hot gourmet meals. The atmosphere is casually elegant, and almost everyone comes in their robe. So, in our white, toga-like wraps, we dined quite well on slow-cooked Wiltshire beef and wild mushroom and Bath Blue cheese risotto with glasses of wine. The menu emphasizes nutritionally balanced foods made from locally produced fare.

Soaking, steaming, feasting—what more could we ask for? My husband and I came away from Bath Thermae Spa feeling relaxed, radiant, well-fed, and squeaky clean. The ancient Romans definitely had the right idea—and the city of Bath has created a first-class modern version of the historic baths. Add it to your itinerary—it’s a highlight of the city.

Clean Water Policy

The thermal water at Thermae Bath Spa bubbles naturally to the earth’s surface, and is estimated to be 10,000 years old. It contains more than 42 different minerals, the most concentrated being sulphate, calcium, and chloride, which are reported to be good for sore joints and some skin conditions.

The spa filters the water to remove iron and bacteria. A tiny bit of chlorine is added for sanitary reasons.

Laurel Kallenbach, freelance writer and editor

For more information on visiting Bath, England, see Visit Bath.

Read more about my travels in England:

The Georgian exterior of Thermae Bath Spa shows the honey-colored Bath stone that appears in buildings throughout the historic city. © Bath Tourism Plus/Colin Hawkins